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ⓘ John Bathe, politician. John Bathe was an Irish barrister and judge. He was a member of a famous legal dynasty, and had a distinguished career under the Tudors, ..




John Bathe (politician)
                                     

ⓘ John Bathe (politician)

John Bathe was an Irish barrister and judge. He was a member of a famous legal dynasty, and had a distinguished career under the Tudors, holding office as Solicitor General for Ireland and Chief Justice of the Irish Common Pleas.

He was a native of County Meath, a member of the old Anglo-Irish to bathe the familys main residence in the castle Athcarne. The family has produced several eminent judges and lawyers, his cousin Jamess sweating, he served as chief Baron of the Irish exchequer under four monarchs. The family claimed the title of Baron Louth in the XV century, but your right it was not recognized by the English crown, who gave it to the family of Plunkett.

He was at Lincolns INN in 1536, and was called to the bar in 1539. He was in the service of the English crown in Ireland to 1546, when he was replaced by Walter Cowley as chief solicitor in Ireland. In 1550, he became king of the Serjeant and the solicitor General. In 1554 he became chief justice of the Irish common pleas, and held this post until 1559, it is unclear whether Queen Elizabeth I decided to replace the chief judge of her half-sister, predecessor and rival, Mary, or he died in that year. We know he was very highly valued to the English crown, praise for "the knowledge of the laws of England, diligence, prudence and loyalty."

He had at least two sons: the eldest son was sir William bathe the castle Athcarne died 1597, who was also a judge in the court of General jurisdiction. On Williams Athcarne death passed to his younger brother James, whose grandson, also called James, was a leading member of the Confederation of Ireland. After the English Civil war Athcarne was cancelled, but in 1665 the younger son Jamess sir Luke bathe he corrected himself, as a reward for what was called his familys suffering, the cause of the English crown, although they are now kept her, for a nominal rent, and the tenants of the crown. The baths remained in Athcarne until about 1700.